Recipe for Progress

Leaping off my discussion of the trajectory of progress, I sped into a world of thinking, how do we achieve progress? Moreover, what can we, as riders, do to ensure we are moving in a direction that we like?

When I visualize the rider I want to be, how ever many years away it may be, what can I do to be that rider? It requires a foundation, a plan. Or in cooking terms – ingredients and a recipe to complete.

Without further ado, my recipe for progress.

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Finished Product. Just kidding. Credits to Mollie Bailey Photos and Chronicle of the Horse.

Continue reading “Recipe for Progress”

What is linear, if not progression?

A phrase we hear commonly in horses – progression is not linear.

I completely concur with this statement, and I can vow the number of times my riding has taken dips and turns that have felt like regression, but overall have shifted me into a more complete and capable rider.

Case in point, Larico. Larico was a fiery dragon of a 20-something year old. He was imported, had an interesting history that made him quirky, and did not suffer fools gladly.

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Sensitive, but dull. Particular and heavy. His preferred ride was exact, he like shorter distances with uphill balance, but even if you set him up perfectly, he’d still throw you for a loop. If you had anything other than a driving seat, you were S.O.L. (Kids, don’t look that one up).

He made me a tough rider, but he also made me a very niche rider. For months after moving on from my favorite dragon, I could not see a distance that was not short. I did not trust longer (or even regular) distances due to his clever abilities to plant his feet.

Case in point.

At the time, I felt this horse ruined me. Each horse I stepped on and manhandled from the onset would grow my guilt. I needed softness back into my riding, and my time with Larico had not encouraged that approach.

The delicate hunters I used to ride were overburdened by my fighting hands and driving seat.

It was not until months past my last ride on Larico did I realize the truth. This horse expanded me.

It was not linear, I did not immediately feel myself capable of handling more personalities, but that is what happened. After Larico, I rode much more confidently (albeit aggressively). Before I was a backseat Sally, now I was driving the car.

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An adorable car, might I add.

Sure, I allowed bad habits with him. But he did a lot of good for me too. Rather than the pushover I once was, I became the decision maker. I was emphatic with producing straightness and quality of strides that before I would mull over to avoid confrontation.

Even my personal life felt it. Two of my most difficult phone conversations I’ve had (a breakup and rejecting a wonderful job offer) I actually held from Larico’s back. Don’t call while riding folks. But I also needed to feel strong and brave.

Because Larico put me through a trial by fire, I knew I could handle it.

My progression after him was not a positive sloping line. I puttered. For many months. Even today, I am still breaking the habit of driving with my tailbone.

Reaching my conclusion, progress is not linear in horses. The frustration of being too far one way, or having a shortfall in another dimension can be exhausting. Progress does not rise continuously.

But is there anything that is effortlessly upward? I am struggling with the answer to this question.

Knowledge perhaps, as our experiences and know-how grows to levels that enhance our expertise. But I’d argue the quality of your information may cheapen (or worsen) your knowledge.

So I am still searching for something linear. But for now, we can enjoy the twists and turns.

What’s in a name?

I’ve always laughed about how appropriately (or inappropriately) a name can describe a horse.

To name a few (famous and not famous) options….

Butterfly Flip

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Joris de Brabadner

Appropriateness (out of 10): 8

I mean, this mare had such grace and effortless float to her. Butterfly flip sounds like an ice skating maneuver.

Chill R Z

Tumblr Source

Appropriateness (out of 10): 2

Talented, agile as all heck. Chill, this horse was not.

Catch Me

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Sigh…

Appropriateness (out of 10): 7

Yeah, I’d need someone to catch me too if I rode a hunter that jumped like this!

Small Affair

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Image Sauce

Appropriateness (out of 10): 3

If you count multiple National championships and that style “small”…

Ligist

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MacMillan Photography

Appropriateness (out of 10): 3

Ligist is German for “hooligan”. I don’t know about you, but when I am called a hooligan, I do not have that level of care toward my job.

This is my level of hooligan.

Tango

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Mare can dance…

Appropriateness (out of 10): 10

Beautiful mover, emblematic of partnership…. I buy in. I am also calling my own bias.

 

Any notable names from your own lives? Either because they are super appropriate (or not)?

The Presence of Parents

I was killing time before getting on Q today and decided to watch the lessons at the ring. I love doing this, and it reminds me of my high school days when I had no hurry and could spend an entire day watching my trainer’s lessons. I rarely get to do that these days, so it’s a treat.

This time, I did not watch my own trainer, but another trainer who rides out of the facility. This woman is an accomplished rider, and while her style can at times be eccentric, I do respect her greatly.

Why are you hedging, you might ask?

Well, I did notice a specific and very common trend with this trainer. This trainer to student behavior is one that I have seen and repeatedly been the recipient of when I was growing up.

During a young teen’s lesson, this trainer was being hard. Her commands were tough, shouting, and exacting. I did not disagree with her corrections, but the manner of them would certainly be on south end of pleasant.

Then, the parent comes to pick her up.

And rather suddenly, the entire tone of the lesson changes. Rather than a laundry list of corrections, the trainer moves to asking exploratory questions and notes of praise. “You cannot jump until you correct your hands” to “You are doing so well with this young horse.”

Again, not disagreeing with earlier phase of instructions, but merely observing how the one parent can alter the color of the conversation.

To a certain extent, it’s expected that a parent presence will elicit a change in the trainer. When your *real* customer shows up, you have to reinforce that they are not spending hard-earned money foolishly.

I remember this as a kid very distinctly, mostly because my parents did not often stick around to watch my lessons. When they did have a weekend day free and would watch a lesson, the flip-flop was stark. I disliked when they watched. My trainer acted oddly. Maybe even disingenuous.

Until this weekend, I had yet to witness this phenomenon as a bystander, and I do think it exemplifies how much of a people business this is. Yes, it’s about getting the right horse flesh in your barn, managing and bookkeeping, and ensuring you have a well-trained staff.

But the horse industry is customer service. And until kids pay for lessons themselves, the parent will always be an ultimate decision maker.

I wish parents stuck around for lessons more. A partnership with horses is so rarely understood outside of horse people, and the more exposure, the higher the likelihood that a parent will “get it”.

Moreover, I wish trainers were more consistent. If you are going to be the tough yeller, own it. If you are going to be supportive and flowery, own that. Admittedly, trainers need various tools to work through diverse issues. That includes a spectrum of approaches – soft and hard.

The distinction lies in addressing the same core problem. To vary the tone of instruction within the span of an hour smells worrying. Especially if that change occurs after parental company arrives. That’s fishy.

Horse people in a nutshell.

I cannot be the only person to notice this?

Why can’t you be perfect?

Loaded question, I know. Why cannot we all ride perfectly, have our horses react perfectly to the amount of pressure we elicit, and have them execute perfectly to those cues?

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Tori Repole Photos; Featured in this Chronicle Article.

Well, there are many reasons. For one, we are human and horses are horses. If you are thinking *no duh* and doing a facepalm, I dare you to keep reading. A point will be made, eventually.

Beyond the unavoidable things that happen to divert us from perfection, what’s wrong with striving for it?

Perfection has a lot of weight to carry. It means that every component of the picture has the same amount of attention to detail.

In the context of horses, this means not jumping a course of crossrails until you master the transition to the canter. And before you produce an uphill, engaged, and straight canter departure, it means building a connected, marching walk.

Before you even step in the saddle, you must command your horse successfully to stand quietly at the mounting block. Before reaching the mounting block, your horse must walk respectfully next to you, listening to your body, hand, voice as you lead them.

I could go on. Perfection is hard. Perfection is work. Perfection is unachievable.

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Tori Repole Photos, Featured in this Chronicle Article.

Why strive for something unattainable?

This is my new state of mind lately with horses and work. If we use an excuse that it will “never happen” to be perfect, then why bother trying to improve?

Asking “what’s the point” is defeatist. We all have room to grow. To focus on the shortfall we will always have limits our potential.

Be healthy in your mindset, strive for perfection, and celebrate your progress.

/ end monologue

How do you all handle the idea of perfection as it relates to horses?